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Jan 26,  · There are no CROCODILES in North Carolina. The American crocodile, the only CROCODILE species found in the United States, is native to the southern most tip of Florida . Are crocodiles in North Carolina? Crocodiles are not native to North Carolina, but two extremely rare Orinoco crocodiles are now living on one of the state’s most popular . Jul 02,  · Crocodiles are not native to North Carolina, but two extremely rare Orinoco crocodiles are now living on one of the state’s barrier islands.
 
 

 

Are crocodiles in north carolina – are crocodiles in north carolina

 

These creatures were almost obliterated from the state in the last century. A small, remnant population lives in southern Florida, but most are found in southern Mexico, Central America, the Caribbean, and northern South America. Their habitat of choice is the fresh or brackish water of river estuaries, coastal lagoons, and mangrove swamps. Alligators become less common in coastal NC as you move from south to north. The current US population, estimated at 2, represents a significant recovery from a few hundred in the s.

Where do нажмите чтобы прочитать больше live детальнее на этой странице North America? Where do American Crocs live?

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American Alligators Alligator mississippiensis can be found throughout the coastal regions of the Southeast, with North Carolina being their northernmost known habitat.

They thrive in NC swamps, rivers, canals, tidal basins, and even ponds and lakes along the coastline and eastern inland regions.

These creatures were almost obliterated from the state in the last century. Charlie, unofficial mascot of the Battleship North Carolina. Photo courtesy of battleshipnc. Kids who pay the annual dues will get a t-shirt, sticker, membership card and discounts to special events.

Visit battleshipnc. Male alligators top out at plus pounds and can grow to a length of 14 feet. Females are smaller, weighing up to pounds and reaching a max of 10 feet snout to tail tip. Alligators grow slower in North Carolina than those living further south because the weather is cooler, and the feeding season is shorter.

When it gets cold, they make a den or underground burrow and shut down. As they brumate their metabolism slows, and they stop eating. Alligators have been observed sticking their snouts out of frozen water to breathe and sometimes become stuck in the ice. Once the ice melts they swim away.

It is easy to see how these adaptable creatures have survived for millions of years. The number of alligators in the state and their range is not fully known.

For that reason, the NC Wildlife Resources Commission is asking people who see alligators to report their sightings. Photo courtesy of Alligator Alliance.

Their primary tool is to educate the public. The couple says they feel very fortunate to be able to observe alligators in the wild in our state and not just in a zoo or an aquarium. The McNeills remind us that as an indigenous species to North Carolina, alligators play an important role in our ecosystem.

When that happens, they lose their natural fear of humans and are often relocated or euthanized. If we all use a common-sense approach, we can co-exist with them. This means, be aware that any body of water in our coastal regions has the potential to have an alligator in or near it. It also means stay away from them, do not feed or harass them and of course, keep children and pets away from them.

If alligators are left alone they can exist as the wild animals they were intended to be, and we can all continue to enjoy these marvels of nature in their natural habitats. They have survived for millions of years and this is their home. Even though their numbers have increased, alligators are classified as a threatened species. It is illegal to harass or kill them.

Seeing an alligator does not always mean it needs to be removed. Normally, according to wildlife experts, give it time and space and it likely will move on. But, if it is in a place that will cause danger to people, pets or livestock you should call a wildlife officer and let them do the removing.

Cases of alligators in the wrong places at the wrong time often make the news. Two such newsworthy stories in North Carolina include the foot, pound Dare County gator killed when a van hit it in May The van was damaged but drivable, the people in the van unhurt. It took heavy equipment to remove the dead alligator from the highway. Another story that made the news happened in Swan Quarter, where a man found an eight-foot long alligator in his garage.

He did the right thing and called the NC Wildlife Resources Commission, and they sent an officer to remove it and return it to its natural habitat. In , a 6-foot American crocodile made a rare appearance outside Florida — at South Carolina’s Isle of Palms, a common spot for vacationing.

The large reptile was caught in the surf and may actually have made his way up the southeastern coast — from Florida — by swimming, plain and simple. After being caught, the croc — an endangered species, exempt from dispatch — was sent back to Florida to live in the wild or an alligator park. Outside of the States, these large creatures carve out homes in the tropics and subtropics of the Americas.

Common environments for crocodiles include mangrove swamps, creeks, lagoons on coasts, tidal estuaries, mouths of rivers, lakes, damp wetlands, bays with ample mangrove trees, coves and ponds. These relatively meek creatures exist in saltwater and freshwater settings alike. Loss of habitat in their native range from urban development and pressure from shrimp farming are problematic for the species. He most recently wrote about the annual oyster roast in Varnamtown in Brunswick County for Coastwatch.

Though slow growing and late to mature, alligators in North Carolina nonetheless appear to be thriving in the Coastal Plain, according to a recent study by North Carolina State University researchers. The N. Wildlife Resources Commission requested the study to determine if the alligator population in the state could sustain a hunting season.

A recent North Carolina State University population survey of alligators indicates that the reptiles appear to be thriving in the state. This foot long, plus-pound alligator was photographed in Cumberland County in This census shows alligator numbers either have remained stable or increased, with the greatest densities in the southeastern part of the state.

The team found abundant populations. For example, in Lake Ellis Simon near Havelock, researchers counted 53 gators compared to 33 in the early s. Orton Pond, south of Wilmington in Brunswick County, had 79 gators compared to 40, also in the early s.