Looking for:

Original biltmore estate map
Click here to ENTER

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Use our free page Biltmore Estate insider’s guide with tips for tours of a priceless collection of art and antiques original to the Vanderbilt home. Use our interactive estate map to find directions across the estate, shuttle routes, locations to visit, and general parking information. Historic Biltmore Village Map. Open full screen to view more. Historic Biltmore Village Merchants. Collapse map legend. Map details.
 
 

 

Biltmore Estate – Wikipedia – Navigation menu

 

We and our partners use data for Personalised ads and content, ad and content measurement, audience insights and product development. An example of data being processed may be a unique identifier stored in a cookie. Some of our partners may process your data as a part of their legitimate business interest without asking for consent.

To view the purposes they believe they have legitimate interest for, or to object to this data processing use the vendor list link below. The consent submitted will only be used for data processing originating from this website.

If you would like to change your settings or withdraw consent at any time, the link to do so is in our privacy policy accessible from our home page. Manage Settings Continue with Recommended Cookies. Biltmore Estate is one of the most popular attractions in Asheville and Western NC, and for good reason. This 8,acre estate will take you on a fairy tale adventure, back to the late s where you can live your day as one of this countries wealthiest families. Your fairy tale adventure will take you through a nearly perfectly landscaped forest, through beautiful mountain farmland, and of course to a castle, Biltmore House – What kind of fairy tale doesn’t have a castle?

Your tour of Biltmore House will be the highlight of your trip, but there is so much more to do and see. Our guide will walk you through the whole estate, highlighting all of the wonderful things to see and do. We visit numerous times during the year, and there is always something new to see and experience. There is something very special about Biltmore, and regardless of how many times we have visited, it’s always like seeing it for the first time when we return.

This Guide to Biltmore Estate will walk you through the estate, and focus on many of the wonderful things to see and do. Plan your visit to Biltmore Estate using this guide as your starting point. Biltmore Estate is located in the beautiful mountain city of Asheville NC. More specifically, just off of Highway 40 at exit In fact, if you’ve traveled along I through Asheville, you’ve driven right over parts of Biltmore Estate and probably didn’t even know it.

To reach the main entry and gatehouse for Biltmore Estate, take Exit 50 from I If you are coming westbound on I, it will be exit 50B. If you are coming eastbound, it will be just exit From Exit 50B, go right, from exit 50 go left at the bottom of the offramp.

Follow Hendersonville Road towards downtown Asheville for a little less than a mile, and you’ll find the Biltmore entrance on your left. Tickets are available online and at the Estate itself. Tickets can also be purchased at the Ticketing Center, just a short drive past entrance, and Gate House.

One of the best deals is purchasing an Annual Pass, which offers unlimited Annual access to the entire Biltmore Estate, along with significant savings on Dining, Shopping, and Lodging, and a number of other pass holder benefits. We’ve personally been annual pass holders for the past two years and love them. If you’ve already purchased tickets, Biltmore will apply the cost of your tickets to an annual pass.

There are special pass “deals” offered in March and November. Visit the magical Biltmore Gardens Railway. This unique exhibit is wonderful for the whole family.

As you turn into Biltmore, you’ll see a large parking area, with a gift shop and welcome center on the left. Continue through the parking area to the original estate Lodge Gate commonly referred to as the Gatehouse, but officially called the Lodge Gate. As you drive through, you’ll be greeted by a security guard on your left that will wave you through.

The guard is sitting in the “office of the gatekeeper”, where the original gatekeepers maintained their watch. To your right, and opposite the office is the entrance hall to the Gatekeeper lodgings. The entry contains a spiral staircase, that takes you to the living area in the top of the gatehouse.

The living area contains a bathroom, storage areas, a kitchen, and two sizeable rooms. From to around , “Old Frank” and his family inhabited the gatehouse, where Ol’Frank was the main gatekeeper. After passing through the Gatehouse, you’ll begin an incredibly beautiful drive through the manicured and landscaped estate grounds. You’ll reach the Reception and Ticket Sales Center in about.

This is where you’ll purchase your tickets if you didn’t purchase them prior to visiting. If you purchased them but didn’t print them, you can pick them up at the Ticket Sales Center as well.

If you pre-purchased and printed your tickets, or if you have Annual Passes, you can just show them to the Biltmore security guards at the Admission gate, just past the entrance to the Ticket Sales Center. After showing your tickets, and passing through security, you can go left to Biltmore House, or right to Antler Hill Village.

During the spring, the fields around the Ticket Center are full of flowering Canola, as seen in the photo above. Canola fields are absolutely beautiful and well worth a visit just to photograph them.

For this guide, we’ll head to Biltmore House, then circle around from there to Antler Village. After turning left past the Ticket Center, you’ll enter Approach Drive, an incredibly beautiful and scenic 3 mile drive up to the Parking area and Biltmore House and Gardens. Drive slow, and enjoy the small details you’ll find as you wind your way through the hardwood forest.

There are small ponds with waterfalls, numerous flowers and flowering bushes, small statues, and much more. The landscaping is amazing and never ceases to fascinate us, even though we’ve seen it many times over.

Before long, you’ll reach a Biltmore staff member that will direct you to the current parking area. Don’t worry if your parking area is a bit of a walk, Biltmore provides free shuttle service up to the front of the house. Pro Tip – If you have an Annual Pass OR if you prefer to drive through to access the gardens and garden areas below the house, turn on your flashers, and the attendants will direct you through, where you can park further down past Biltmore house, closer to the gardens.

After parking, make a note of your location and walk to the nearest shuttle station, where you can board a shuttle and be taken right to the front of the house. Biltmore House is the largest privately owned home in the United States. The estate formally opened to family and family friends on Christmas Eve of The house is , square feet and contains rooms, 42 bathrooms, 65 fireplaces, and 3 kitchens.

The house was very advanced for the day and age, including electric elevators, central heating, centrally controlled clocks, fire alarms, a call bell system, an indoor pool, bowling alley, and workout center. The house is fully furnished and decorated and includes a number of pieces of priceless art, antiques, and collectibles, many original to the house when it opened. As you approach the stone entryway to Biltmore House, look to your right.

If you’ve never seen the Biltmore House before, this is a sight to see, and something you will remember. I remember seeing it for the very first time, during a middle school field trip – I was speechless. The house is about as beautiful and majestic as it gets. The shuttle bus will take you past the fountains up the front of the house. You can enter the front of the house to begin your tour if you have your reservations.

If not, you can make reservations at the nearby ticket center if required. Additional “behind the scenes tours” are also available for an additional cost, and advanced reservations are required. As you pass the fountains, you are following the same Vanderbilt and his guests would take when visiting the home. Prior to it opening, there where railroad tracks here to bring in workers and supplies for the construction. To the right of the house, you’ll find the original Carriage House, which has a number of restaurants and shops, along with restrooms.

To the left of the house, a path will take you down to the gardens. Pro Tip – If this is your first time visiting, be sure to do the audio tour. The audio tour will take you through the home, offering historical and “insider” information. You can pick up the audio tour as you enter the house, through the main entrance. In addition to seeing Biltmore House, one of the highlights of your trip will be strolling through the acres of gardens on the estate.

People travel from all over the world to see them, and for good reason, they are amazing. This is particularly true in the spring, during Biltmore Blooms. Don’t miss Biltmore Blooms! From the front of the house, take the path down and to the left. The estate gardens were designed by the famous landscape architect, Frederick Law Olmsted.

You’ll see reflecting pools in the Italian Gardens, Arbors full of Wisteria, Tulips, and Azaleas in the walled garden, and so much more. No, you won’t find Colonel Mustard with a candlestick here, at least not that we’re aware of, but you will find an amazing collection of plants from around the world, all indoors, and viewable year round. Stepping into this beautiful Conservatory, located right next to the walled garden, is like walking into a tropical jungle full of abundant plant life, and lots of small hidden details to find.

The Conservatory is open year-round, and full of various plants from all over the world. Past the Conservatory, is the Biltmore Bass Pond. You can either drive down and park on the roadside or take a longer hike from the Gardens. There are trails that take you all the way around the pond, and you can also access the Woodlands Trail and Meadow Trail from here as well.

All of the hiking trails and estate area are dog-friendly as well. When the Vanderbilts lived at Biltmore, the primary form of transportation around the estate was by horse, either through carriage, wagon or on horseback. Take a few extra minutes, and drive up past the Deerpark Restaurant to the Carriage house and horse stables. The Old Barn, The “Biltmore Belgians”, and the farm animals on the way up are definitely worth the trip!

While visiting, stop by the office and get information on two popular outdoor activities: horseback riding and carriage rides. About half-way between the House and Antler Village, the road goes alongside the French Broad River, and past a small area called the Lagoon. The Lagoon is not only a great place for a nice picnic, but it provides one of the best views of Biltmore House.

You’ll see the Lagoon on the left as you head away from Biltmore House. To access the parking area, take one of the two small gravel roads to the left.

 
 

Original biltmore estate map –

 
 

The Conservatory is open year-round, and full of various plants from all over the world. Past the Conservatory, is the Biltmore Bass Pond. You can either drive down and park on the roadside or take a longer hike from the Gardens. There are trails that take you all the way around the pond, and you can also access the Woodlands Trail and Meadow Trail from here as well.

All of the hiking trails and estate area are dog-friendly as well. When the Vanderbilts lived at Biltmore, the primary form of transportation around the estate was by horse, either through carriage, wagon or on horseback. Take a few extra minutes, and drive up past the Deerpark Restaurant to the Carriage house and horse stables. The Old Barn, The “Biltmore Belgians”, and the farm animals on the way up are definitely worth the trip! While visiting, stop by the office and get information on two popular outdoor activities: horseback riding and carriage rides.

About half-way between the House and Antler Village, the road goes alongside the French Broad River, and past a small area called the Lagoon. The Lagoon is not only a great place for a nice picnic, but it provides one of the best views of Biltmore House.

You’ll see the Lagoon on the left as you head away from Biltmore House. To access the parking area, take one of the two small gravel roads to the left. The Lagoon parking area also provides access to walking and bike riding trails that go alongside the French Broad River.

These are very popular. Antler Hill Village is your destination for shopping, dining, and staying at Biltmore. Antler Hill Village also features a number of shops, Cedric’s Tavern and a Petting Farm with a number of farm animals. Biltmore’s Outdoor Adventure Center is here and serves as the starting point for nearly all of Biltmore’s outdoor activities, including biking, carriage rides, Segway tours, Land Rover Experience and much more.

During the summer, you’ll often find live bands playing in the “Village Green” along with a number of other special activities and events. Antler Hill Village should definitely be on your list to stop and see when visiting the estate.

In the early s, George Vanderbilt began establishing the Estate as a place for fine wine, as Vanderbilt began to collect world-renowned wines and storing them in the Biltmore Wine Cellars. Fast forward to , where the Biltmore Dairy, during a large construction effort, was turned into the Biltmore Winery.

Today, this modern Winery, which produces wines from grapes grown on the estate is the most visited winery in the United States.

At this modern, historical, and simply gorgeous winery, visitors can taste complimentary samples, enjoy behind the scenes wine tours, participate in specialty wine experiences, and of course purchase the Winery’s many different selections of fine wines. Wine tastings and self-guided tours of the winery are included with your Biltmore Ticket purchase.

For , a new wine bar has opened and offers a wonderful way to relax after a fun-filled day visiting Biltmore Hosue and the Estate. Whether you just can’t fit everything into a single day, or if you just want to spend the evening enjoying the luxurious accommodations provided by the exquisite Estate lodging options, Biltmore has an overnight stay option for you.

The Village Hotel, located right in Antler Village provides easy access to a number of dining options, outdoor activities and of course shopping. The Village Hotel provides a casual but nice environment and amenities at a moderate price level. Amenities include a fitness center, outdoor swimming pool, free parking, and complimentary shuttle to Biltmore House. Looking for the same level of service that the Vanderbilt’s treated their own guests? The Inn on Biltmore Estate provides luxurious 4-star elegance and personalized service.

Biltmore Estate includes a number of wonderful dining options. All restaurants are within the estate, and Biltmore tickets are required to reach them.

Dining options include:. We’ve been visiting Biltmore House and Estate for more than 30 years, and in that time, we’ve learned a few tips that will help you make your stay FAR more enjoyable:.

Vendor List Privacy Policy. Share 0. Tweet 0. Pin 0. Table of Contents. Tickets Tickets are available online and at the Estate itself. Visit the amazing and beautiful Biltmore Blooms event with us at Biltmore Estate. Take a tour of Biltmore’s famous Walled Garden with us. The Lodge Gate and Main Entry As you turn into Biltmore, you’ll see a large parking area, with a gift shop and welcome center on the left. Reception and Ticket Sales Center After passing through the Gatehouse, you’ll begin an incredibly beautiful drive through the manicured and landscaped estate grounds.

Approach Drive After turning left past the Ticket Center, you’ll enter Approach Drive, an incredibly beautiful and scenic 3 mile drive up to the Parking area and Biltmore House and Gardens. Biltmore Gardens In addition to seeing Biltmore House, one of the highlights of your trip will be strolling through the acres of gardens on the estate. The Conservatory No, you won’t find Colonel Mustard with a candlestick here, at least not that we’re aware of, but you will find an amazing collection of plants from around the world, all indoors, and viewable year round.

Be sure and stop off at the boathouse, which is beautiful, and very romantic. The Riding Stables and Barn When the Vanderbilts lived at Biltmore, the primary form of transportation around the estate was by horse, either through carriage, wagon or on horseback.

The Winery In the early s, George Vanderbilt began establishing the Estate as a place for fine wine, as Vanderbilt began to collect world-renowned wines and storing them in the Biltmore Wine Cellars. Staying at Biltmore Whether you just can’t fit everything into a single day, or if you just want to spend the evening enjoying the luxurious accommodations provided by the exquisite Estate lodging options, Biltmore has an overnight stay option for you.

Village Hotel The Village Hotel, located right in Antler Village provides easy access to a number of dining options, outdoor activities and of course shopping. The Inn on Biltmore Estate Looking for the same level of service that the Vanderbilt’s treated their own guests?

With his fortune he would construct what has been called the largest private, and certainly one of the most famous, houses in the world— the Biltmore Estate in Asheville, NC. Selecting a name for his estate, Vanderbilt referenced his family— and the mountains of Western North Carolina.

Construction of the magnificent structure began in It took six years for over workers to complete the project. Located just south of downtown Asheville, the estate originally included , acres of Appalachian forestland.

The main house is sprawling. It boasts , square feet, rooms, and 65 fireplaces, all within 4 grand levels. In the late s, the area was still so remote that Vanderbilt had to build a private railway to the site to transport supplies. He also constructed a village complete with a post office and a church to accommodate the laborers and their families. With Biltmore, Vanderbilt planned to replicate the working estates of Europe. Renowned architect Richard Morris Hunt combined the plans of several French chateaux in his design of the house.

In addition to Hunt and Olmstead, Vanderbilt made another insightful hire. The forests around Biltmore were put under the watchful eye of Gifford Pinchot. He went on to be the first director of the U. Forest Service. Upon his departure, Dr. Today the Biltmore Estate maintains its majestic presence. Annually, thousands of visitors arrive. They marvel at the indoor pool, huge library, seat banquet table, and bowling alley — all constructed in the 19th century.

Vanderbilt loved to travel and frequently visited Asia, Africa, and Europe. On those trips he purchased hundreds of rare furniture pieces, tapestries, art, books, and novelties. The limestone columns were carved to reflect the sunlight in aesthetically pleasing and varied ways per Vanderbilt’s wish. The rusticated base is a contrast to the smooth limestone used on the remainder of the house. The steeply pitched roof is punctuated by 16 chimneys and covered with slate tiles that were affixed one by one.

Each tile was drilled at the corners and wired onto the attic’s steel infrastructure. Copper flashing was installed at the junctions to prevent water from penetrating. The fanciful flashing on the ridge of the roof was embossed with George Vanderbilt’s initials and motifs from his family crest, though the original gold leaf no longer survives. Biltmore House had electricity from the time it was built, though initially with DC, due to Vanderbilt’s friendship with Thomas Edison. With electricity less safe and fire more of a danger at the time, the house had six separate sections divided by brick fire walls.

Vanderbilt paid little attention to the family business or his own investments. It is believed that the construction and upkeep of Biltmore depleted much of his inheritance.

Biltmore has four acres of floor space and rooms in the house, including 35 bedrooms for family and guests, 43 bathrooms, 65 fireplaces, 3 kitchens and 19th-century novelties such as an electric Otis elevator, [20] forced-air heating , centrally controlled clocks, fire alarms, and a call bell system. To the right of the marbled Entrance Hall, the octagonal sunken Winter Garden is surrounded by stone archways with a ceiling of architecturally sculptured wood and multifaceted glass.

The centerpiece is a marble and bronze fountain sculpture titled Boy Stealing Geese , created by Karl Bitter. On the walls just outside the Winter Garden are copies of the Parthenon frieze. The table could seat 64 guests and is surrounded by rare Flemish tapestries and a triple fireplace that spans one end of the hall.

On the opposite end of the hall is an organ gallery that houses a Skinner pipe organ. Left unfinished with bare brick walls, the Music Room was not completed and opened to the public until The mantel had been stored in the stable for over 80 years. To the left of the entrance hall is the 90 ft-long 27 m Tapestry Gallery, which leads to the Library, featuring three 16th-century tapestries representing The Triumph of Virtue Over Vice.

The two-story Library contains over 10, volumes in eight languages, reflecting George Vanderbilt’s broad interests in classic literature as well as works on art, history, architecture, and gardening. The library also houses a concealed passageway that leads to the guest rooms. The second-floor balcony is accessed by an ornate walnut spiral staircase.

The Baroque detailing of the room is enhanced by the rich walnut paneling and the ceiling painting, The Chariot of Aurora , brought to Biltmore by Vanderbilt from the Palazzo Pisani Moretta in Venice , Italy. The painting by Giovanni Antonio Pellegrini is the most important work by the artist still in existence. The second floor is accessed by the cantilevered Grand Staircase of steps spiraling around a four-story, wrought-iron chandelier holding 72 light bulbs.

Several large-scale masterpieces are displayed in the hall, including two John Singer Sargent portraits of Biltmore’s architect, Richard Morris Hunt , and landscaper, Frederick Law Olmsted , both commissioned for the home by Vanderbilt.

His bedroom connects to his wife’s Louis XV-style , oval-shaped bedroom in the north tower through a Jacobean carved oak paneled sitting room with an intricate ceiling. The third floor has a number of guest rooms with names that describe the furnishing or artist that they were decorated with. The fourth floor has 21 bedrooms that were inhabited by housemaids, laundresses, and other female servants.

Also included on the fourth floor is an Observatory with a circular staircase that leads to a wrought iron balcony with doorways to the rooftop where Vanderbilt could view his estate. Male servants were not housed here, however, but instead resided in rooms above the stable and complex. The Billiard Room is decorated with an ornamental plaster ceiling and rich oak paneling and was equipped with both a custom-made pool table and a carom table table without pockets.

The room was mainly frequented by men, but ladies were welcome to enter as well. Secret door panels on either side of the fireplace led to the private quarters of the Bachelors’ Wing where female guests and staff members were not allowed.

The wing includes the Smoking Room, which was fashionable for country houses, and the Gun Room, which held mounted trophies and displayed George Vanderbilt’s gun collection. The basement level featured activity rooms, including an indoor, 70,gallon ,litre and cubic meter heated swimming pool with underwater lighting, a bowling alley, and a gymnasium with once state-of-the-art fitness equipment.

The service hub of the house is also found in the largest basement in the U. It holds the main kitchen, pastry kitchen, rotisserie kitchen, walk-in refrigerators that provided an early form of mechanical refrigeration, the servants’ dining hall, laundry rooms, and additional bedrooms for staff. In the conservatory which has many flowers and trees growing in it, there is even a model railway.

Vanderbilt envisioned a park-like setting for his home and employed landscape architect Frederick Law Olmsted to design the grounds.

Olmsted was not impressed with the condition of the , acres sq mi; km 2 and advised having a park surround the house, establishing farms along the river, and replanting the rest as a commercial timber forest, a plan to which Vanderbilt agreed. Gifford Pinchot and later Carl A. Schenck were hired to manage the forests, with Schenck establishing the first forestry education program in the U.

Another important aspect of the landscaping was the intentionally rustic four-mile 5 km Approach track that began at the brick quoined and pebbledash stucco Lodge Gate at the edge of Biltmore Village and ended at the sphinx-topped stone pillars at the Esplanade. In between, the lane was densely planted along the borders with natural and uncultivated-looking foliage and shrubbery to provide a relaxing journey for guests.

Olmsted made sure to incorporate 75 acres 30 ha of formal gardens , which had been requested by Vanderbilt for the grounds directly surrounding the house. He constructed a Roman formal garden , a formal garden, a bush and tulip garden, water fountains, and a conservatory with individual rooms for palms and roses.

There was also a bowling green , an outdoor tea room, and a terrace to incorporate the European statuary that Vanderbilt had brought back from his travels. Water was an important aspect of Victorian landscaping, and Olmsted incorporated two elements for the estate: the Bass Pond created from an old creek-fed millpond and the Lagoon. Each was used for guest recreation such as fishing and rowing. To supply water for the estate, Olmsted engineered two reservoirs.

One was a spring-fed man-made lake on nearby Busbee Mountain. The other was a man-made, brick-lined reservoir, located behind the statue of Diana in the Vista, at an elevation of approximately ft 81 m above the Esplanade. Vanderbilt’s idea was to replicate the working estates of Europe. He asked Richard Morris Hunt and Frederick Law Olmsted to design a village with architecturally compatible buildings and picturesque landscaping.

He intended it to be a source of income through rental cottages, a place to help carry out philanthropic programs, and an easy point of access between the estate and the train station. The village included rental cottages complete with plumbing and central heating, a post office, shops, doctor’s office, school, and a church, known today as the Cathedral of All Souls.

Intending the estate to be self-supporting, Vanderbilt set up scientific forestry programs, poultry farms, cattle farms, hog farms, and dairy.

His wife, Edith, also enthusiastically supported agricultural reform and promoted the establishment of a state agricultural fair.